McKinley, WVU Kick-Off Research Workshop With NIH

Workshop Will Help West Virginia Colleges and Universities Boost Grant Funding

f t # e
Washington, September 19, 2018 | comments
Today, Congressman David B. McKinley, P.E. (WV-1) helped kick-off a two-day workshop with key leaders from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Morgantown. The workshop, hosted by West Virginia University, is focused on increasing the competitiveness of West Virginia universities and colleges in attracting research grants.
share: f t

Today, Congressman David B. McKinley, P.E. (WV-1) helped kick-off a two-day workshop with key leaders from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Morgantown. The workshop, hosted by West Virginia University, is focused on increasing the competitiveness of West Virginia universities and colleges in attracting research grants.

 A dozen top officials from NIH are making presentations during the workshop. The event is expected to draw more than 200 representatives from West Virginia University, Marshall, and other higher education institutions across the state.

 “West Virginia needs to diversify to take advantage of fast growing sectors in the 21st Century economy,” said McKinley. “Attracting research dollars, especially in health care, can help us accomplish that.”

 “We’ve watched as Pittsburgh and other cities have transformed thanks in large part to the research and innovation happening at their universities and medical facilities,” said McKinley. “Yet for too long West Virginia has lagged at the back of the pack in attracting cutting-edge research.”

 Last year, West Virginia ranked 45th out of the 50 states in securing funding from NIH.

 “Under President Gordon Gee’s leadership, WVU is taking big steps to improve its competitiveness in research,” said McKinley. “They understand what this means not only for the university, but the state. We need everybody to buy into this vision so we can improve our standing.”

 “This workshop will help researchers from WVU, Marshall, and other schools, be more effective in pursuing grants,” added McKinley. “NIH is funding cutting edge research on cures for cancer, Alzheimers, and many other diseases. Conducting more research in West Virginia will not only improve the health and well-being of the people who live here, but will have far-reaching benefits to our economy.”      

  

Background:

McKinley has been a leading advocate for increasing funding for NIH, as well as attracting more research money to West Virginia:

  • Since 2012, McKinley has been the leader of an annual bipartisan letter to House Appropriators urging additional funding for NIH.
  • During that time, NIH’s budget has increased from $30 billion to $39 billion.
  • McKinley has had multiple meetings with NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins and other NIH leaders to discuss their work and how to improve West Virginia’s competitiveness on grant funding.
  • This grant workshop came as a result of a meeting McKinley had in July with NIH, who offered to come to Morgantown and hold a workshop.
  • WVU President Gee and Dr. Clay Marsh, Vice President & Executive Dean for Health Sciences, readily agreed to host the meeting.

McKinley has similarly fought for more resources for West Virginia in the fight against opioids:

  •  Earlier this year, McKinley brought the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to Morgantown to hold a grant workshop.
  • More than 150 people from all 20 counties in the First District attended.
  • Following the workshop, several groups have been awarded grants totaling in the millions.
  • Thanks to his work, West Virginia has received a five-fold increase in grant funding targeting the opioid crisis.

 

###

f t # e

Stay Connected

Use the form below to sign up for my newsletter and get the latest news and updates directly to your inbox.