McKinley Applauds Release of Affordable Clean Energy Rule

EPA Releases New Rule to Give States Flexibility to Reduce Emissions and Set Standards

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Washington, August 21, 2018 | comments
Chairman of the Congressional Coal Caucus, Congressman David B. McKinley, P.E., (WV-1) issued the following statement in response to the release of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Affordable Clean Energy Rule. This new rule would replace the Obama Administration’s harmful Clean Power Plan, which the Trump Administration repealed in last year.
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Chairman of the Congressional Coal Caucus, Congressman David B. McKinley, P.E., (WV-1) issued the following statement in response to the release of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Affordable Clean Energy Rule. This new rule would replace the Obama Administration’s harmful Clean Power Plan, which the Trump Administration repealed in last year.

“President Trump is keeping his promise to revitalize the coal industry. One of his first actions in office was to roll back the Obama Administration’s regulations on power plants that were an unconstitutional, bureaucratic and ideologically-driven assault designed to kill coal,” said McKinley.

“Under President Trump’s leadership, our country is taking a different path that promotes American energy dominance and innovation that allows us to use our abundant resources cleaner than ever before. Rather than overstepping its role, the government will work with the states and give them the flexibility to set standards. And the government will no longer pick winners and losers in an attempt to set America’s energy policy,” McKinley added.

Click here to read the EPA’s full announcement.

Click here to see the details on the new Affordable Clean Energy Rule.

Background
The Clean Power Plan (CPP) was finalized by the Obama Administration in August 2015 and contained a series of unconstitutional, bureaucratic regulations designed to harm the coal industry. These regulations on power plants would’ve killed jobs and made electricity more expensive. The CPP also threatened the reliability and resiliency of our nation’s electric grid. Over the last 15 years, 531 coal-fired power plants have closed, and had the rule remained in place, more closures would have occurred, further weakening America's electric grid.

After the CPP’s release, Congress took bipartisan action to block the rule’s implementation. In December 2015:

• The House passed a resolution to repeal the CPP provision mandating CO2 reductions on existing power plants (passed 242-180). The Senate passed the resolution 52-46.
• The House passed a resolution to repeal the CPP provision mandating CO2 reductions on new power plants (passed 235-188). The Senate passed the resolution 52-46.
• President Obama vetoed both of the resolutions.

In February 2016, the Supreme Court issued a historic stay on the implementation of the CPP until the numerous legal challenges could be heard.

In March 2017, as one of his first actions in office, President Trump signed an executive order directing the EPA to consider repealing the CPP.

In October 2017 EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt announced a new rule that formerly withdrew the CPP.
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